FAQ

Will You Come Too?

Frequently Asked Questions

How hard is the course?

Runners have reported this course to be moderately challenging. The trails are wide and well groomed, with a few gravel covered steep hills which will leave definitely leave your legs burning. It starts out in an open grassy area running along the tree line, then heads into the woods. It loops around itself once and there are race marshals and signs posted throughout to guide you in the right direction. A water station is set up where the course loops back.

The course was set up and marked as a cross country trail 5K by the Hilton High School XC coach. Here is a color-coded map. Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 11.51.11 AM

Is the course stroller-friendly?

That depends on your stroller and your physical condition. If you’re accustomed to pushing an all-terrain stroller up hills and over trails, you should be fine. But read above to see if that’s what you really want to do.

What is the day like?

Visit our schedule page here:

Schedule

Is fundraising required in order to participate?

No it’s not, but keep in mind we are hosting this event to raise money for a very rare, serious, and life threatening disease. Of every dollar we raise, $.86 goes right to the research and the programs that help kids and families diagnosed with Fanconi anemia. 97% of the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund $2 million budget is raised through family fundraising like this.

How can I help out?

Other than participating in the run we have lots of volunteer opportunities and a sponsorship program. See “Get Involved” tab at the top of this page.

How is Eli doing?

Eli’s doing awesome. He’s in sixth grade at an amazing school and is followed by a team made up of doctors both here and in Cincinnati. He goes for annual check-ups to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital every summer, and regular check ups here at home as needed. His growth is and always has been a bit below and putting on weight is an issue. But he’s an exceptionally normal boy.

The older Eli gets the more frequent his medical check ups will be. We have to watch carefully for any unusual spots in his mouth and for any symptoms concerning his throat, since the most common cancer with FA is Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Once he hits teen age years he’ll have regular throat scopes to look for any changes. Prevention is key, as is a healthy lifestyle. Hosting a 5K promotes this healthy lifestyle, and he runs right along with the participants.